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Black children have the right to be children

February 21, 2018

Historically, Black children have been exposed to a racist system, which not only exposes them to unspeakable violence, but also criminalization. In 2018, Black children still need protection. Through the life of Trayvon Martin and others, community members and organizers are standing up for the basic rights of Black children to ensure they make it through each phase of their childhood – and exercise their right to be children.

Gentrification = genocide!

February 20, 2018

Land and housing is a humane right for All; not a privilege and a way to reap more profits for the monied interests! As WE see it, these latest efforts to “re-develop” and “gentrify” our cities – from San Francisco to Oakland, Harlem to Chicago and beyond – are a continuation of the centuries-long horrific wars of mass genocide perpetrated by European capitalism, European (white) nationalism and the false doctrines of European (white) “superiority” and racist terrorism.

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So … Marvel finally made ya’ll love Africa?

February 12, 2018

Shanequa Jenkins never wanted nothin’ to do with Africa. When her roommates would demand that she turn off “Love and Hip Hop” so they could watch “Hidden Colors,” she would just storm out the room calling them “Hotep Hoes” under her breath. So, it shocked her roomies when two hours before the “Black Panther” premier she was waiting at the front door in a brand new dashiki with matching Red Bottoms and Coach Bag yellin’, “Y’all ain’t ready to go, yet!?”

‘Black Panther’ stars and creators challenge negative African stereotypes

February 12, 2018

“Black Panther” follows T’Challa/Black Panther’s journey, in the aftermath of his father’s death, to lead his technologically advanced nation, Wakanda, which the world believes is impoverished. Featuring Black actors from the United States, England and various parts of Africa, “Black Panther” is the first Marvel film set in a Black-ruled nation. As such, the film challenges the negative stereotypes in which the world typically views African nations.

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Benefits for the Bay View: Performances of ‘Solitary Man’ Feb. 10 & 14

February 9, 2018

Don’t miss the highly acclaimed play, ‘Solitary Man: My Visit to Pelican Bay State Prison,’ performed by Charlie Hinton and Fred Johnson. Fred and Charlie launched the new two-person version in September 2017 and return now, on Feb. 10 and 14, for two performances as benefits for the SF Bay View newspaper: Saturday, Feb. 10, 7:30 p.m., at ANSWER, 2969 Mission St., San Francisco and Wednesday, Feb. 14, 7 p.m., at Freedom Archives, 518 Valencia, San Francisco – Show the Bay View some love on Valentine’s Day!

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I Sing the Song of the Black Man

February 4, 2018

I sing the song of the Black Man — The Eternal Black Man — The uncreated, unborn, everlasting — Alpha and Omega Man — The Afrikan, the Indian, the Mexican and the CaucAsian — I am that I am — I am all men in different variations — The tallest and the shortest man — The thinnest and the broadest man — I am the bass, the baritone and the soprano man — My range covers the whole spectrum — From the bottom to the top of man — I am the Huemanitarian — From which all men get their color and hue — Of all the carbon copies — I am the Original Man — The origin of man —

‘Black Magic Women’

February 3, 2018

Feb. 15 is the official release date for “Black Magic Women: Terrifying Tales by Scary Sisters,” associated with the reference guide “100 Black Women in Horror.” The new book is being released on Mocha Memoirs Press, a publishing house out of North Carolina that does a lot of work with Black authors and women authors alike and is owned and operated by Nicole Kurtz, an African American woman.

Black bobsled battle for Olympic Gold

February 2, 2018

Two women, Elana Meyers Taylor, the No. 1 bobsled driver in the world, from Douglasville, Georgia, with Lauren Gibbs of Los Angeles as her brakeman, are expected to win the Olympic gold medal at the PyeongChang 2018 Winter Games, the first bobsled gold for the USA in 16 years. Aja Evans from Chicago, Illinois, is brakeman for another team, with Brianua Jones ready for any replacement duties. Americans of African descent are well represented in this very high tech sport.

Aaron Pointer, McClymonds grad, star of major league baseball, denied MLB pension

February 1, 2018

Know who Aaron Pointer is? How about Cuno Barragan? Or Dave Roberts, Wayne Cage and Bill Murphy? They are all retired persons of color who currently don’t receive pensions from having played Major League Baseball (MLB). Mr. Pointer doesn’t receive a traditional pension from MLB because the rules for receiving MLB pensions changed in 1980. Pointer and the other men do not get pensions because they didn’t accrue four years of service credit.

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Wanda’s Picks for February 2018

February 1, 2018

Celebrate Dr. Espanola Jackson Day on her birthday, Feb. 9, with the San Francisco Bayview Hunters Point community. We take this opportunity to honor the memory of Espanola as a community leader during Black History Month. For details of the event, which will be held in the Alex Pitcher Room at the Southeast Community Center, go to the Facebook and register your RSVP online with Eventbrite. All are welcome. Spread the word.

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Taking a stand: Black athletes revive protest in the sports world

January 31, 2018

When political resistance erupted throughout the country after Trump’s election, professional athletes were hardly expected to be catalysts for social change, or even on the front lines of protest. Back in the 1960s individual athletes expressed dissent – U.S. sprinters John Carlos and Tommie Smith gave the All Power to the People salute from the 1968 Olympic podium in Mexico City. Heavyweight champion Muhammad Ali rejected the draft because of his opposition to the Vietnam War. They paid a heavy price.

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2018 Black History Month Celebrations

January 30, 2018

Join the San Francisco African American Historical & Cultural Society for a series of events to celebrate Black History Month. The national theme, “African Americans in Times of War,” has been enhanced to include “A Resilient Spirit,” the story of African American people. Dr. Dawn Elissa Fisher, keynote speaker, chair of Department of Africana Studies, San Francisco State University, will kick off the Black History Month Celebration at City Hall Rotunda on Friday, Feb. 2, 2018, at 12 noon. The public is invited.

Dr. H. Geoffrey Watson: Water saves lives

January 28, 2018

Geoffrey Watson, M.D, diplomat, member of the American Board Of Internal Medicine, president and CEO of the James A. Watson Wellness Center, located at 5709 Market St., Oakland, is on a mission to promote a healthier lifestyle, increase weight loss and save the community money by educating the community on the benefits of drinking water. Dr. Watson states that 70 percent of a man’s body and 60 percent of a woman’s body consists of water.

Oh Happy Day! Edwin Hawkins goes home to his Father’s House

January 18, 2018

Edwin Hawkins, the four-time Grammy® Award-winning leader of The Edwin Hawkins Singers’ 1969 million-seller “Oh Happy Day,” died Jan. 15 at his home in the Bay Area, after a bout with pancreatic cancer. He was 74 years old. “It is with deep sadness that we announce the passing of Dr. Edwin Hawkins – a celebrated artist, innovator and music icon. Though he will be greatly missed the world over, the message of love, life and encouragement that he incorporated into his music gives us all the same hope that we’ll join him in heaven and sing ‘Oh Happy Day,’” the Hawkins family said.

Another look at Martin Luther King Jr.

January 15, 2018

There are many facts about King’s life that are not widely known to today’s African youth. One example is that he visited Africa before Malcolm X and Elijah Muhammad. Kwame Nkrumah invited King to Ghana’s independence celebration on March 6, 1957. Malcolm X’s first visited Egypt in 1959. King was light years ahead of his contemporaries on the South African question. It must be understood that the masses of Africans in the Western Hemisphere re-embraced pan-Africanism in the 1970s.

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Wanda’s Picks for January 2018

January 9, 2018

Congrats to new San Francisco Mayor London Breed! Congrats to TheatreFirst for “Participants,” the kind of collaborative theatre project which should be the norm, not the exception. Make sure you check out the finale for the TF 2017-18 season: “Between Us” and “Just One Day” beginning Feb. 18. Listen to two engaging conversations with playwrights and actors about “Participants”: Dezi Soléy and Cheri L. Miller, Skyler Cooper, Nick Nanna Mwaluko, Carl Lumbly.

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Message to the Black Man (and the world) 2018

January 3, 2018

I attended the prom in my Golden Fleece and my gold-centric Pharaoh of Oakland attire (see photo). I like to dress like this from time to time in spite of the intense petty hate stares I get. I like to dress like this to give people permission to be fabulous on any day! Every day! I like to dress like this because I’m a poet, artist and musician … in everything I do. I like to dress like this to let people know that in spite of it all: And still we rise!

Transportation gentrification: How Bus Rapid Transit is displacing East Oakland

January 1, 2018

We youth scholars from Deecolonize Academy and POOR Magazine submitted 14 Freedom of Information Act requests to 14 departments in the City of Oakland, only to receive a series of messages from two of the departments saying, “We have no documents,” and no word from the others. On Jan. 16, we will be making a demand to the City of Oakland and AC Transit that, with the money they received for BRT, they support Oakland residents to be able to stay here as reparations for the millions of dollars they are receiving to displace us out of here.

SFAAHCS Film Festival: ‘African Americans in Times of War: A Resilient Spirit’

December 30, 2017

For 62 years, the San Francisco African American Historical and Cultural Society has been one of the leading voices promoting Black history and the contributions of African Americans both nationally and locally. The 2018 Black History Month theme is “African Americans in Times of War: A Resilient Spirit.” The kickoff celebration will be held in the San Francisco City Hall Rotunda on Friday, Feb. 2, at 12:00 noon.

Journalist, poet Frank Marshall Davis (1905-1987) fought fascism to cure the disease of American racism

December 19, 2017

Journalist and poet Frank Marshall Davis is an important voice who channeled his social convictions through the power of the pen, and proved to be an unsung hero in the struggle for human rights. “Frank Marshall Davis established his reputation as a socially minded poet employing free-verse forms.” His work has been recognized by the National Poetry Foundation, stating on their website: “Davis concerned himself with portraying Black life, protesting racial inequalities, and promoting Black pride.”

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