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Posts Tagged with "police brutality"

UN committee urges US government to pay reparations for slavery

February 7, 2016

A United Nations panel of human rights activists has urged the United States’ government to pay reparations to the descendants of Africans who were brought to the U.S. as slaves. The committee blamed slavery for the plight of African-Americans today. The U.N. Working Group of Experts on People of African Descent’s preliminary report follows a year of aggravated racial tensions in the United States that saw the rise of the Black Lives Matter movement.

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Filed Under: California and the U.S.
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Black Chicagoans with disabilities stand solid against police terror

January 30, 2016

The activism of the late May Molina can be seen in two young Black disabled activists, Candace Marie and Timotheus Gordon Jr., of Chicago today living in the middle of not only the aftermath and protesting of the police shooting of Laquan McDonald, but also budget cuts in special education and the recent release of a Hollywood film, “Chi-Raq,” that have pointed the spotlight on Chicago.

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Filed Under: California and the U.S.
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Growing up in Compton: A woman’s story

January 28, 2016

Often, women’s experiences are less present in the stories of how violence has decimated lives, families and communities. From these women writing from inside, we learn of remarkable efforts by families to resist police violence and terror, confront criminalization, and refuse state efforts to turn communities against each other. These stories are critical to the histories emerging from Compton and other sites of ongoing struggle.

Supporters of justice for Mario Woods, executed firing squad-style by SFPD on Dec. 2, braved unusually cold weather on Christmas Eve to rally on the steps of City Hall. They marched in and up to Room 200, the mayor’s office, to see him, but aides said he wasn’t there. – Photo: Majeid Crawford

No justice, no peace: Black SF demands Mayor Ed Lee fire Chief Greg Suhr and killer cops!

December 29, 2015

Once a killer cop, always a killer cop! Black San Francisco is demanding that Mayor Ed Lee face the music and fire Chief Greg Suhr, as well as the five officers involved in the execution of Mario Woods, a young man with special needs who was gunned down by five gang members of the SFPD. Records reveal that many of the officers involved had used deadly force on unarmed individuals in the past.

Hundreds of students, who walked out of class and marched from 16th and Mission to City Hall, unfurled their banner and rallied on the steps, as a cop in the background stood watch. – Photo: Paulette Justice

Youth power against police brutality: Students stand in solidarity for Mario Woods

December 24, 2015

Hundreds of middle and high school students from Black and Brown low income communities in San Francisco marched together last week in solidarity to protest the execution of Mario Woods. At only 26 years, Mario Woods, a young man with special needs, was gunned down in his own neighborhood by the SFPD. “We are sick and tired of the police killing our homies!” yelled the students as they marched from the corner of 16th and Mission Street to the steps of City Hall.

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The People’s Minister of Information JR Valrey and Cuban National Assembly member Kenia Serrano display a copy of the Bay View, the paper where their interview will appear. – Photo: Kali O’Ray

Cuban National Assembly member Kenia Serrano speaks on diplomatic normalization with the US

December 16, 2015

Kenia Serrano is a member of the Cuban National Assembly, as well as the president of the Cuban Institute of Friendship with the People. We sat down with her to discuss the normalization of diplomatic relations, Cuban-developed medical technologies that the U.S. has been denying its residents because of the blockade, the release of the Cuban 5 and the security of our beloved Black Liberation Army political exile Assata Shakur.

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Filed Under: Haiti and Latin America
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Amid complaints from police that they’re being intimidated, Chicago youth, one on one, show they are not afraid during Nov. 24 protests over the dashcam video of Officer Van Dyke’s murder of Laquan McDonald. – Photo: Chicago Tribune

#LaquanMcDonald: As video released, cop charged with murder 1, activists demand Police Supt. McCarthy, State’s Attorney Alvarez resign

November 26, 2015

The City of Chicago has released, under court order, the dashcam video from the brutal killing of 17-year-old Laquan McDonald by a Chicago police officer – and it’s as bad as we all expected. At the same time as they released the video, the county prosecutor announced she’d be pursuing first degree murder charges against McDonald’s killer, Officer Jason Van Dyke. Unfortunately, these are charges that should have been filed a year ago.

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Filed Under: California and the U.S.
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Marcus Abrams, 17, was attacked when police found him and a couple of friends on the Metro Transit tracks. Abrams, who has autism, says police slammed him to the ground, causing him to suffer a seizure. He was not charged with a crime. – Photo: Adrienne Broaddus, KARE

Sister shares story about police profiling and beating her autistic brother

November 24, 2015

I’m used to reading about and advocating for adults with disabilities, but today our Black and Brown youth with disabilities are increasingly targeted for police brutality and incarceration. Everybody cares about kids, so when will disabled and Black community activists focus more on stopping state violence against youth with disabilities and providing programs after the tragedy?

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Filed Under: California and the U.S.
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Eight hundred people filled Harvard’s Memorial Church on Oct. 30, 2015, when Alicia Garza, Oakland-based co-founder of the Black Lives Matter network, was the honoree of the ninth annual Robert Coles “Call of Service” Lecture and Award. She began by dedicating the award to the BLM network and the people “still fighting for humanity and dignity.” When she coined the phrase Black Lives Matter in 2013, she called it “a love letter to our people” and “a call to action.” – Photo: Jon Chase, Harvard staff photographer

Alicia Garza honored at Harvard: One equal temper of heroic hearts

November 21, 2015

Before I drew closer to the wide steps of the church, I realized my mistake – it was not empty at all. Three lines of people stood waiting to enter the doors to hear what Alicia Garza had to say. That evening she would be receiving the Robert Coles “Call of Service” Award. The Coles Award is certainly prestigious, if for no other reason than that Harvard’s famous Dr. Robert Coles is known to set the bar very high to encourage others to follow his example.

Wopashitwe Mondo Eyen we Langa

Political prisoners for 45 years – yet Mondo and Ed live lives that matter

October 31, 2015

When people hear the story of Ed and Mondo, some say the prison time is a waste of their lives. They have wasted nothing. Despite their circumstances, and they are bleak to be sure, they each live productive lives, “lives that matter.” During the last 45 years, both men have continued to teach and influence, to set a positive example and guide their peers. They serve as a reminder to us all to make each day count for something more than ourselves.

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Filed Under: Prison Stories
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Seven things we learned from Thabo Sefolosha’s trial

October 13, 2015

After just under an hour of deliberation, a Manhattan jury acquitted Atlanta Hawks guard Thabo Sefolosha of misdemeanor charges ranging from obstructing government administration and disorderly conduct to resisting arrest last week. The charges stemmed from a late-night confrontation with the New York Police Department last April that left Thabo with a broken leg.

Ñ Don’t Stop logo

Rebel Diaz’ Ñ Don’t Stop webisode is biggest show on TeleSur English

August 29, 2015

Revolutionary, Bronx based, political Latino rap group Rebel Diaz strikes again: This time it’s not a dose of reality Hip Hop that they serving, but a new political and cultural education tool better known as Ñ Don’t Stop, a webisode that regularly appears on the Venezuelan media website TeleSur English that will also soon be hitting television screens worldwide.

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Filed Under: Culture Stories
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Julian Bond on Ebony cover 0569

Julian Bond, race man

August 22, 2015

Of all the labels and titles that could rightfully be appended to Bond – activist, politician, lecturer, commentator, professor – he wished to be remembered most as a “race man”: “A race man is an expression that’s not used anymore, but it used to describe a man – usually a man, could have been a woman too – who was a good defender of the race, who didn’t dislike White people, but who stood up for Black people, who fought for Black people. I’d want people to say that about me.”

When thousands marched in St. Louis for Ferguson October, Black activist support for Palestine was prominent. – Photo: Christopher Hazou

1,000 Black activists, scholars and artists sign statement supporting freedom and equality for Palestinian people

August 21, 2015

Over 1,000 Black activists, artists, scholars, students and organizations have released a statement reaffirming their “solidarity with the Palestinian struggle and commitment to the liberation of Palestine’s land and people.” “We urge people of conscience to recognize the struggle for Palestinian liberation as a key matter of our time,” the statement asserts.

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Filed Under: Africa and the World
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SFPD beats Black one-legged homeless man, 42, at 8th & Market 080415 by Chaedria LaBouvier

I watched 14 police officers take down a one-legged homeless Black man outside Twitter HQ – and nobody could stop them

August 19, 2015

Last week I was on my way to visit Medium’s headquarters in San Francisco to discuss a project that I’m working on, mainly focused around police brutality. Funnily enough (or not so), I ended up being over an hour late, because this happened. I recorded the incident Aug. 4, 2015, during the lunch hour. It involves a Black man who was taken down by police in the mid-Market area of San Francisco, between Seventh and Eighth streets.

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Filed Under: SF Bay Area
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Bobby Seale

Bobby Seale: Community control of police was on the Berkeley ballot in 1969

August 13, 2015

I was the founding chairman and national organizer of the Black Panther Party. Our first organizing tactic was to legally observe the police in our Oakland and Berkeley Black communities. During those hard core late 1960s racist, fascist times, we took a big chance with our lives patrolling the police. It was a time of rampant vicious police brutality and murder of Black people by police that was 10 times worse than today.

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Filed Under: SF Bay Area
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Sandra Bland drove to Texas to start a new job, so how did she end up dead in jail?

July 16, 2015

On July 9, 28-year-old Sandra Bland drove to Texas to start a new job at Prairie View A&M. On July 10, police stopped Bland just outside the campus for allegedly failing to signal while changing lanes. Police claim that during the stop she became combative, was thrown to the ground, arrested and charged with “assault on a public servant.” On July 13, around 9 a.m., before her family could bail her out, Bland was found dead inside a Waller County, Texas, jail cell.

Cynthia McKinney smiles as she prepares to speak at Laney College in Oakland April 24, 2013, on a tour organized by the Bay View and the Block Report. – Photo: Darnisha Wright

Stars and Bars and Stripes: Are you ready for this conversation on race?

July 12, 2015

Are we ready, finally, to have the conversation on race that President Bill Clinton suggested the United States needed? The Saint Andrew’s Cross, which is the Battle Flag of the Confederacy, now known as the Confederate Flag, symbolizes a fact of history that most White Southerners choose to deny: enslavement of Africans forcibly trafficked to this country and their systematic dehumanization while here – sentiments and aspects of which continue to this day.

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Filed Under: California and the U.S.
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Called “Chicago shows love to Jon Burge torture victims,” supporters staged a dramatic demonstration in the snow on Feb. 14, 2015, as Chicago deliberated reparations. The long line named 118 victims, including Aaron Patterson. – Photo: Sarah Jane Rhee

Attorney Demitrus Evans on the case of political prisoner Aaron Patterson

July 9, 2015

I caught up with Aaron Patterson’s lawyer, attorney Demitrus Evans, to get the story firsthand. This will be the first in a series of stories that I am working on to expose the cases of current day Black political prisoners in this country, because it is very important that our people know the truth about how this government deals with the people who truly do work on behalf of our empowerment.

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Filed Under: Prison Stories
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Paul and Dominique check the script.

‘Driving While Black’ comedy screening at the SF Black Film Fest

June 7, 2015

“Driving While Black” is one of the few comical films in the San Francisco Black Film Festival this year, yet its subject matter deals with a not-so-funny topic. What I liked most about this film is that is a satirical look at how police of all ethnicities treat young Black men. I sat down and talked to the writers, Dominique Purdy and Paul Sapiano, about how they came up with the concept to write a comedy about police terrorism.

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