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Posts Tagged with "United Nations"

“Dying to Live” hunger strikers’ supporters stop to pose for this picture before delivering their letter to Wisconsin DOC Secretary Jon Litscher in Madison on June 21. The prisoners are willingly starving themselves to end solitary confinement.

Wisconsin prisoner hunger strike enters second week, spreads to multiple facilities – you can help!

June 22, 2016

On June 10, Wisconsin prisoners held in long term solitary confinement at Waupun Correctional Institution started a “food refusal campaign.” They wish to bring the horror of administrative confinement (AC) to the public’s attention and end this torturous practice. Solitary confinement for more than 15 days has been deemed “torture” by the United Nations, but in Wisconsin, the Department of Corrections has held many prisoners in isolation for decades.

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Filed Under: Prison Stories
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Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and Mexican President Felipe Calderon toast during a luncheon in his honor at the State Department in Washington, Wednesday, May 19, 2010. The next day they traded barbs when Calderon criticized a new Arizona law requiring racial profiling. Clinton responded, “You should take the log from your own eye before criticizing the speck in your neighbor’s.” – Photo: Cliff Owen, AP

Hillary Clinton’s dark drug war legacy in Mexico

March 26, 2016

Mexico, John M. Ackerman wrote recently for Foreign Policy, “is not a functional democracy.” Instead, it’s a “repressive and corrupt” oligarchy propped up by a “blank check” from Washington. Since 2008, that blank check has come to over $2.5 billion appropriated in security aid through the Mérida Initiative. Clinton’s State Department overlooked human rights abuses and corruption while keeping a lucrative flow of contracts moving to U.S. security firms working in Mexico.

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Filed Under: Haiti and Latin America
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Sen. Bernie Sanders speaks as former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton smiles during an ABC News debate in December. – Photo: Disney, ABC

Sanders and Clinton on ‘the next Rwanda’

March 14, 2016

Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders sparred about U.S. foreign policy in Latin America, and particularly Honduras, during this week’s debate in Miami, Florida. In other debates, they have discussed the Middle East, Libya, Egypt, Russia, China and North Korea, but not Sub-Saharan Africa, aside from a few statements as to whether or not the U.S. should have intervened in Rwanda 22 years ago. KPFA’s Ann Garrison reports.

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Filed Under: Africa and the World
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UN panel hears wrenching testimony of abuse in Black Chicago

February 2, 2016

After 2.5 years of foundation laying work, Willie JR Fleming of the Anti-Eviction Campaign has finally caught the attention of the international community. At his behest, the United Nations sent its Working Group of Experts on People of African Descent to Chicago to take first-hand testimony from people of color who have suffered and continue to suffer the effects of systemic racism and colonialism.

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Filed Under: California and the U.S.
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Amid complaints from police that they’re being intimidated, Chicago youth, one on one, show they are not afraid during Nov. 24 protests over the dashcam video of Officer Van Dyke’s murder of Laquan McDonald. – Photo: Chicago Tribune

#LaquanMcDonald: As video released, cop charged with murder 1, activists demand Police Supt. McCarthy, State’s Attorney Alvarez resign

November 26, 2015

The City of Chicago has released, under court order, the dashcam video from the brutal killing of 17-year-old Laquan McDonald by a Chicago police officer – and it’s as bad as we all expected. At the same time as they released the video, the county prosecutor announced she’d be pursuing first degree murder charges against McDonald’s killer, Officer Jason Van Dyke. Unfortunately, these are charges that should have been filed a year ago.

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Filed Under: California and the U.S.
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The lifeless body of 3-year-old Aylan Kurdi lies on the shore of Turkey near Bodrum on Sept. 2.

Regime change refugees on the shores of Europe

September 16, 2015

Terrible pictures arrive onto social media of refugees from Syria and elsewhere, washed up on the shores of Europe. One in particular is particularly ghastly – the body of young Aylan Kurdi. He was only 3. He was from the Syrian town of Kobane, now made famous as the frontline of the battle between ISIS and the Kurdish militias (largely the YPG and PKK). Aylan Kurdi’s body lay in a fetal position. Few dry eyes could turn away from that photograph.

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Filed Under: Africa and the World
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Cynthia McKinney speaks at the graduation ceremony.

Former U.S. Congresswoman Cynthia McKinney completes PhD at Antioch University, despite having to scrub WikiLeaks from her dissertation

August 9, 2015

Graduating from Antioch University’s PhD program in Leadership and Change on Aug. 1, 2015, Cynthia McKinney fulfilled a lifelong dream to complete her education with a terminal degree. In keeping with her interests in U.S. policy, Dr. McKinney wrote her dissertation on the leadership challenges faced by President Hugo Chavez as he asserted the Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela’s right to sovereignty.

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Filed Under: Culture Stories
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From the report: “The TDCJ also fails to provide effective medical care for its inmates. … The TDCJ neither monitors these inmates nor provides them with adequate living conditions to prevent suffering and death during the summer months. Indeed, all 14 inmates who have died since 2007 under the care of the TDCJ suffered from pre-existing medical conditions exacerbated by the heat … Five of the deceased spent less than a single week in custody before succumbing to the dangerously high temperatures in Texas facilities. … Even where the TDCJ has issued specific standards to protect heat-sensitive inmates, such as in work or recreation areas, the TDCJ fails to actually implement these standards.” – Photo: Lauren Schneider

‘TDCJ placed me in harm’s way because I spoke out in reference to the extreme heat’

July 19, 2015

Greetings, brothers and sisters. This year in Texas we have seen a marked increase in the exposure of heinous acts of abuse and mis­treatment perpetrated by state employees who work for the Texas Department of Criminal Justice. Behind the scenes, the prisoners responsible for this massive movement to combat injustice have be­come victims of retaliation and harassment at the hands of prison officials and, elected state government officials.

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Filed Under: Prison Stories
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Demonstrators in the Solomon Islands, which lie east of Papua, show solidarity with West Papua’s bid to join Melanesian Spearhead Group. Melanesia, consisting according to Wikipedia of Solomon Islands, Vanuatu, Fiji, Papua New Guinea, New Caledonia, Maluku Islands and West Papua, is named for the melanin that shows the people’s original home was in Africa.

West Papua’s rightful place

May 25, 2015

In one month’s time, the eyes of the Pacific will turn to Melanesia as our leaders gather in Honiara (national capital of the Solomon Islands, located on the island of Guadalcanal) to decide on West Papua’s membership in the Melanesian Spearhead Group. For more than 50 years, my people have suffered a creeping genocide under a repressive Indonesian military occupation that is estimated to have claimed 500,000 West Papuan lives. Next month’s meeting is a critical opportunity to give my people a voice and to allow us to take our rightful place in the Melanesian family.

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Filed Under: Africa and the World
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Haiti has been on the march for months. These politically astute protesters make their purpose clear. The face of the person holding the sign has been blurred to protect his identity.

With general strikes and marches, Haitians demand government by the people

March 1, 2015

The people of Haiti held a two-day general strike on Monday and Tuesday, Feb. 9 and 10, as part of ongoing popular mobilizations throughout the country. They also successfully struck the week before on Feb. 2. The Martelly government responded with brutal repression in various communities such as in Montrouis, where massive use of tear gas killed two children and police gunfire wounded a number of community residents.

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Filed Under: Haiti and Latin America
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What would compel a man to try to cut his own face off?

January 30, 2015

“What sort of conditions could be so unbearable that they’d drive a person to suffer cutting through the skin, nerves, muscles and arteries of his own face, at the risk of permanent disfigurement, disability or even death?” Amerika inflicts such extreme torture on prisoners that they routinely commit such acts as could never be expected of a sane and stable mind. And this is the point: Solitary confinement drives people into insanity.

Screenwriter Paul Webb, director Ava DuVernay and actor David Oyelowo portray a humanized Dr. Martin Luther King. – Photo: Atsushi Nishijima, Paramount Pictures

‘Selma’: Unexpected bounty

January 12, 2015

I’ve finally seen “Selma” and can report it is a proper civil rights movie. By that I mean it takes few chances either thematically or aesthetically. The icons remain intact and the movement free from revisionist recriminations. This cautious strategy is understandable in a risk-averse Hollywood. Although boxed in by those kinds of commercial expectations, “Selma” delivers even more than it should.

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Filed Under: Culture Stories
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Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff reviews U.N. troops in Haiti. – Photo: Blog do Planalto

Et tu, Brute? Haiti’s betrayal by Latin America

November 18, 2014

Without Haiti’s help, there would not have been any independent country in Latin America. On January 1, 1816, when Simon Bolivar arrived in Haiti, downtrodden and desperate for help to fight the Spanish, the only two republics in the Western Hemisphere were the United States, where slave ownership was in force, and Haiti, which had fought for and earned its independence in what is still the only successful slave rebellion ever in the world.

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Filed Under: Haiti and Latin America
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The world famous memorial for Mike Brown, before and after the Sept. 23 fire. This memorial is at the curb; another remains in the middle of the street, where Mike was murdered by Darren Wilson.

Fire destroys Michael Brown memorial, some residents cry arson

September 23, 2014

Just before 7 a.m. on Sept. 23, the memorial erected on Canfield Drive, mere feet from where unarmed Black teenager Michael Brown was gunned down by police officer Darren Wilson, went up in flames. Twitter lit up with pictures and outrage. Many who were at the scene report smelling something that may have been used as an accelerant. However police and officials are saying that candles near the memorial site are what caused the blaze.

Rodney Leon

Wanda’s Picks for August 2014

August 2, 2014

Congratulations to Gerald Lenoir for carrying the torch and blazing the way for so many social justice issues from HIV/AIDS awareness in the Black community to his recent work in just migration for Pan Africans. Much success on your new work! Farewell to Alona Clifton and much success in Atlanta. Congratulations also to Almaz Negash, founder and director of African Diaspora Network in Silicon Valley for her national recognition and award at the Continental African Leaders Summit in Washington, D.C.

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Filed Under: Culture Stories
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The unholy alliance between Belize and Israel: A commentary for freedom

July 31, 2014

The unholy alliance between the Belizean governments both past and present with the occupiers of Palestinian land, the so-called state of Israel, is one of the biggest failures in Belize’s foreign policy. It will surely go down as the disgraceful use of elitist power which defies our socio-historical experience, morality and diplomacy strategies. The modern state of Israel is a recent imposition.

Connecting the dots throughout the world leading to economic empowerment

July 29, 2014

From now on we are going to connect each and every city and nation that has significant numbers of members of the African Diaspora. We will begin to communicate on a regular basis and plan economic projects to employ more and more workers and build more and more wealth via entrepreneurship. These dots of people of African descent will become the envy of the world. Oh, how resilient we have been. Now we will not only survive but begin to thrive.

The Christian nonviolence organization Pax Christie writes: “There is a refugee crisis on the U.S.-Mexico border and a war in Central America and Mexico against children … (They) are making a perilous journey north, … fleeing from the countries with the highest murder rates in the world. … Undocumented children have become the new scapegoats. … Do not deport these children. Protect them. Help them reunite with their families. Welcome the stranger. Welcome the children.”

Child refugees: When children are ‘the enemy’

July 27, 2014

I’ve been watching for days now as media reports display the growing hatred at the arrival of Central American children across the Mexican-U.S. border. American voices crackle with bile as they begin the drumbeat for their immediate deportation. They are refugees from want and war, almost all the result of U.S. interventions in Central America in support of murderous military governments and the mindless drug war.

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Filed Under: Haiti and Latin America
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Every week, as some 3,000 additional families’ water is shut off by their “public” utility, Detroiters protest on Freedom Friday. – Photo: Ryan Felton

‘We are hiding out with no water’: Detroit privatizers deny poor people their right to water

June 28, 2014

In March 2014, the Detroit Water and Sewerage Department announced it would begin shutting off water ser­vice for 1,500 to 3,000 customers every week if their water bills were not paid. Thousands of families are now without water. A coalition of grassroots groups submitted a report to the United Nations naming these shut-offs as a violation of human rights.

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Filed Under: California and the U.S.
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Rwanda 2014: 24 years after the Ugandan invasion

April 17, 2014

Twenty-four years after the Ugandan invasion of Rwanda in October 1990, both the history of the four-year war that followed and realities of life on the ground in Rwanda today are fiercely disputed. Claude Gatebuke survived the violence and founded the African Great Lakes Action Network (AGLAN) to promote truth and reconciliation in Rwanda and the rest of the Great Lakes Region of Africa.

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