Saturday, October 23, 2021
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Tags Ku Klux Klan

Tag: Ku Klux Klan

Dear white people, please don’t lose your minds

If America behaves like a schoolyard bully as its white population becomes a minority, Oscar Blayton poses that the community of nations will not stand for it.

California’s stolen Black land: Bruce’s Beach, Folsom, Allensworth, the Fillmore

By hook or by crook, and a shake or two of KKK collusion, no fair playing field was created for early Black entrepreneurs, nor their descendants who today demand action from reparations task forces.

Ida B. Wells-Barnett is a sterling example for all incarcerated journalists

We know her name – Ida B. Wells-Barnett – but do we know how her very essence laid the groundwork for, and is woven deeply into the fabric of, today’s struggles? Uhuru B. Rowe, with elegance and expertise draws a powerful picture for our enlightenment about this profound human icon.

Low-key race war

The birth of our nation is still bleeding, hemorrhaging actually, and we don’t know if the sirens we hear in the distance are those of the KKKops to apply the knee or a bullet, or an ambulance with a tourniquet and new blood.

From ‘movement moments’ to change, from the Red Summer to Black...

It is said that Mark Twain once quipped that “history does not repeat itself, but it rhymes.” One cannot escape comparisons with 1968, and with widespread civil unrest, troops in the streets, warring abroad and a rabidly reactionary Republican president seeking re-election while executing his own Southern Strategy replete with dog-whistle appeals to “law and order,” such comparisons are not without merit.

Black doctor: ‘I’m COVID-19 positive’

“I’m COVID-19 positive. I’m doing well. I’m isolated in my house. I will be out of commission for two to three weeks. I have cared for several COVID-19 patients. One was not recognized initially and this may have been the one that the infection came from. Can’t wait to get back in the fight.”

Heroic or heinous: The death penalty case of Thomas Porter

Thomas Porter is a 42-year-old Black man held on Virginia’s Death Row for the Oct. 25, 2005, shooting death of a Norfolk, Virginia, cop. At his trial, it was undisputed that the cop walked up and grabbed him around the throat without warning, then tried to throw him to the ground. Thomas reflexively pushed the cop back, asking what he was doing. Without warning or explanation, the cop pulled his gun and fired on Thomas but missed. In a split second reaction, Thomas pulled and fired his own gun, fatally hitting the cop in the head – a clear case of self-defense.

‘Sorry to Bother You’ director Boots Riley rips Spike Lee’s ‘BlackKkKlansman’

Boots Riley has a problem with Spike Lee's “BlacKkKlansman,” and he explained why in a three page essay. Besides being the veteran rapper from Oakland’s The Coup, Riley is also a filmmaker who created the movie “Sorry to Bother You,” which, like Spike’s film, has a lot of buzz surrounding it. If you’re familiar with the subject matter of “BlackKkKlansman,” then you know it’s based on the true life story of former Colorado Springs officer Ron Stallworth and how he infiltrated the local Ku Klux Klan through the telephone.

Outing the Bay Area campaign contributors to KKK fascist David Duke

According to Wikipedia, David Ernest Duke, born July 1, 1950, is an American white nationalist, politician, anti-Semitic conspiracy theorist, Holocaust denier, convicted felon and former imperial wizard of the Ku Klux Klan. Some have suggested that the best way to fight back against all the hate being spread around by the Trump regime, the KKK, neo-Nazis and white supremacists, is by exposing the supporters of hate and violence in the good old USA. One place to start exposing them would be to expose some of the local supporters of David Duke who reside in the Bay Area.

Charlottesville solidarity: Undeterred protesters march in Oakland to tune of Strange...

The mass of roughly 1,000 protesters, which included representatives of the Black Panthers, gathered in Oakland’s Latham Square at approximately 7 p.m. Saturday evening before taking to the streets. Demonstrators were angered over events which had taken place earlier that day in Charlottesville, Virginia, where alleged Nazi sympathizer, James Alex Fields Jr., mowed down several people with his car in an incident similar to recent terrorist attacks in London and Nice, France. One person was killed and 19 others were injured in Charlottesville.

Rashid: Thrown in solitary for publicizing abuses

On July 14, 2017, I was brought before a Florida Department of Corruptions (FDC) Institutional Classification Team (ICT) for a staged hearing to have me thrown in solitary confinement, euphemistically called Close Management (CM) by the FDC. As described in my recent article “I’m off to Florida,” the basis for this recommendation was my involvement in publicizing prison abuses in other states where I’d been confined. Florida officials vowed to put a stop to my activities.

Collective liberation: The time is NOW

Take Em Down NOLA is a multi-ethnic, multi-generational coalition of organizers committed to the removal of ALL symbols of White Supremacy in the city of New Orleans, including but not limited to school names, public parks, street names and monuments. This struggle is a part of the greater struggle for racial and economic justice in New Orleans. Now you may wonder why, amidst all the manifestations of social injustice, we choose to focus on symbols.

‘Accidental Courtesy’ is the story of a Black bluesman who befriends...

In the film “Accidental Courtesy: Daryl Davis, Race and America,” the activist quietly befriends the philosophical offspring of the white supremacists who made Dr. King’s job so hard from Bombingham to Selma. Daryl Davis, Black man, holds the unique distinction of being an expert on the Ku Klux Klan. We get to travel across the country with Davis as he introduces us to his people – white supremacists and racists. The question he poses, “How can you hate me when you don’t even know me?”

‘Deep Denial: The Persistence of White Supremacy in United States History...

“Race is the Rubicon we have never crossed in this country.” That’s David Billings’ thesis in his provocative new historical memoir, “Deep Denial: The Persistence of White Supremacy in the United States History and Life.” It documents the 400-year racialization of the United States and how people of European descent came to be called “White.” Billings tells us why, despite the Civil Rights Movement and an African-American president, we remain, in his words, “a nation hard-wired by race.”

Colin Kaepernick won’t stand up for slavery

Lots of people are up in arms asserting you are unpatriotic if you refuse to stand for the Star Spangled Banner. We see this playing out with Colin Kaepernick. People like to romanticize about how it’s an expression of pride for this beloved country. How many of y’all patriots know we only sing one verse to that song? How many of y’all know the other verses are about hunting down slaves? The song is about recapturing slaves who tried to run away and even fought against their masters to escape bondage during the War of 1812. But Colin needs to stand and sing that song? Yeah, right.

Wanda’s Picks for May-June 2016

Elaine Brown’s “A Taste of Power,” a memoir which chronicles her leadership of the Black Panther Party for Self-Defense when co-founder Huey P. Newton is imprisoned, still resonates with me. The idea that a Black woman is nominated to the leadership position of the most powerful civic organization in the country at that time is still remarkable and speaks to what Kathleen Cleaver calls revolutionary imagination.

On self-defense against racist murder

For us to make sense of the relentless, 400-year-long onslaught of racist violence against New Afrikans and other nationally oppressed people in Amerika and the absence of a collective program of comprehensive self-defense and secure communities among the majority of the New Afrikan population in the U.S., it’s important we first grasp the origin of this contradiction, as all other points of contradiction and irrationality flow from it.

Black and Brown unity against police impunity

San Francisco’s Black and Latino/a communities came together March 18 on the steps of City Hall to launch a united campaign to end police impunity in the officer-involved murders of Mario Woods, Alex Nieto and Amilcar Pérez López. The new Black and Brown United Coalition coalesced after the shocking March 10 exoneration of police in a federal civil trial in the killing of Alex Nieto, 28, by a jury on which no Blacks or Latinas or Latinos had been selected to serve.

Mumia Abu-Jamal: The genius of Huey P. Newton

To those of us who were alive and sentient, the name Huey P. Newton evokes an era of mass resistance, of Black popular protest and of the rise of revolutionary organizations across the land. To those of subsequent eras – youth in their 20s – the name is largely unknown, as is the name of its greatest creation: the Black Panther Party. It is up to the oppressed of every generation to plumb the depths of history and to excavate the ore of understanding, to teach us not what happened yesterday, but to teach us why today is like it is, so that we may learn ideas to change it.

Nuclear terrorism kills millions, enriches the few

Maybe we should look more broadly when defining terrorism – as something beyond just foreigners or lawbreakers. Some terrorists may actually operate within the law. One such example is environmental terrorism, generated by those companies that pollute our ecosystem with harmful chemicals that enter human bodies and cause people to suffer and die. Any discussion of terrorism should include those who are harming our precious planet and its inhabitants.
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