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Black History Matters  

February 3, 2017

by Raymond Nat Turner Abracadabra Open sesame Om Presto Poof! Twisting useless, endless parades of powdered wigs, wars, battles, bills, laws, names, dates, great men, generals, captains of industry, presidents Bore us to tears … We must be real Historians  – Ju-ju workers with Way Back Machines Alchemists mixing molten metals – Sorcerers with wise […]

‘Gimmie Mines Reparations,’ Fleetwood’s new documentary film

February 2, 2017

“It’s a poison that contaminates and has wounded America for centuries, it’s called racism and the healing process will never begin until the U.S. government does right by the descendants of slaves brought here from Africa,” says Robert “Fleetwood” Bowden, director of the powerful new documentary film “Gimmie Mines Reparations.” He’ll be screening it at the Bayview Library, 5075 3rd St., at 6:30pm on Wednesday, Feb. 22, for a Black History Celebration. You’re invited and urged to bring family and friends to this free event.

Make your body a place where cancer is not welcome

February 1, 2017

In 1971 President Nixon declared war on cancer. Clearly, we have lost that war, because cancer is fast overtaking heart disease as the number one cause of death in America. Hopefully, we are finally coming to understand that to successfully respond to cancer requires changing the environment in our body so that millions of misbehaving cancer cells cannot thrive. Our emphasis should be on safe and reliable things we all can do to make our body a place where cancer is not welcome.

Hubert Harrison: Growing appreciation for this giant of Black history

January 31, 2017

Hubert Harrison (1883-1927), the “father of Harlem radicalism” and founder of the militant “New Negro Movement,” is a giant of our history. He was extremely important in his day and his significant contributions and influence are attracting increased study and discussion today. In this 90th year since his death in 1927, let us all make a commitment to learn more about the important struggles that he and others waged. Let us also commit to share this knowledge with others.

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Hedda Gabler: Britney Frazier stars in Cutting Ball’s stunning Ibsen classic

January 30, 2017

Britney Frazier is stunning as Hedda Gabler in Cutting Ball Theatre’s current production of 19th-century Norwegian playwright Henrik Ibsen’s classic. Hedda is a spoiled girl who settles on husband Jorgen Tesman because he demands, she says, the least emotionally from her. Francisco Arcila’s Tesman, a scholar, remains preoccupied with his work, yet delights in his wife’s choice of him. The story is deceptively simple, but then so is much of life.

‘Deep Denial: The Persistence of White Supremacy in United States History and Life’ by David Billings

January 29, 2017

“Race is the Rubicon we have never crossed in this country.” That’s David Billings’ thesis in his provocative new historical memoir, “Deep Denial: The Persistence of White Supremacy in the United States History and Life.” It documents the 400-year racialization of the United States and how people of European descent came to be called “White.” Billings tells us why, despite the Civil Rights Movement and an African-American president, we remain, in his words, “a nation hard-wired by race.”

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‘Mama at Twilight’: Can love kill?

January 28, 2017

Ayodele Nzinga’s “Mama at Twilight: Death by Love” is a haunting look at a family crippled by circumstances. How does a man prepare for adult responsibilities when his father is nowhere around? When a young Marie-Rose meets Mario Jefferson at 15 doing community service at her father’s church, she knows he is the man she wants to spend her life with. Three grown children later, Mama still loves the man she fell in love with and has no regrets over its costly price or the raised eyebrows and whispers that sought to sanction her.

Take a stand and ride with Michael Marshall and Equipto against police brutality

January 27, 2017

Veteran R&B soul singer ​Michael Marshall​ and ​Frisco 5​ activist and rapper ​Equipto​ address the societal issue of police brutality and injustice in their new song “Tonight We Ride.” “People didn’t believe it for so long. Now we have video showing we weren’t making it up,” said Marshall. The goal of the ​GOFUNDME campaign​ is to raise $4,000 for completion of the “Tonight We Ride” video and to create awareness around his new movement R.I.D.E (REACT. INVESTIGATE. DOCUMENT. EXPOSE.).

Jay Z calls for Rikers Jail to be closed

January 26, 2017

Today marks the first anniversary of President Obama ending juvenile solitary in the federal prison system in response to the case of New York City teenager Kalief Browder, who committed suicide in 2015 at the age of 22. In 2010, when Kalief was just 16, he was sent to Rikers Island, without trial, on suspicion of stealing a backpack. He always maintained his innocence and demanded a trial. Instead, he spent the next nearly three years at Rikers – nearly 800 days of that time in solitary confinement.

Black Family Day is Jan. 21 at Willie Brown Middle School

January 20, 2017

Mark your calendars! The first Black Family Day of 2017 takes places on Saturday, Jan. 21, 2017. This event will be at Willie L. Brown Jr. Middle School, 2055 Silver Ave. in the Bayview district. The goal of Black Family Day is to connect Black families to much needed resources and to capitalize on the leadership skills already present by giving them the skills needed to navigate public and private systems on behalf of their families. The focus of this event is reducing summer learning loss.

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Glen Upshaw to receive Humanitarian Award from Living Jazz at ‘In the Name of Love’ annual tribute to Dr. King on Sunday

January 13, 2017

Coming of age in the ‘60s was a trying time for young African American men whose taste of power made it hard to relinquish their dreams of equality and true democracy shortly thereafter in the ‘70s during the Reagan years with the war on Black people, disguised as a war on drugs. Nonetheless Glen Upshaw did not let fear mitigate or guide his behavior. A peacemaker or violence interrupter, his job is to de-escalate situations before they happen or restore peace and safety in situations where violence has taken place.

Review of the new blockbuster ‘Hidden Figures’

January 12, 2017

Scientists Katherine Johnson, Dorothy Vaughan and Mary Jackson, profiled in “Hidden Figures” (2016), exemplify what writer Margot Lee Shetterly calls “everyday courage,” a kind of imaginative power that filled these women – Black women, white women, invisible women – with a sense of pride and purpose even when deserved recognition went unstated. Director Theodore Melfi’s film is all the buzz.

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Why our schools need community volunteers

January 5, 2017

This holiday season, many are wondering what we can possibly do to get involved and create real change in our communities. One way to make a difference at the local level is to become a volunteer in public schools, especially schools that are under-resourced and can really use the support. Anyone who has stepped inside a school knows teachers and principals simply cannot do it alone. It takes a whole team of caring adults to educate a child.

Estella Washington: 108 years of loving service to family and community

January 4, 2017

In 1908, Estella Washington was born to Eli and Ellie Bendy in Texas. Later, she joined her family in California, where she worked at the Post Office and taught special needs children in the San Francisco public schools. Estella was a devout Christian. On Nov. 19, 2016, Estella Washington departed this life surrounded by family in the arms of her loving granddaughter. She went peacefully and did not suffer.

Uppity Edutainment presents ‘Out of Darkness’ Jan. 14

January 3, 2017

Uppity Edutainment presents “Out of Darkness,” a full length three-part documentary, on Saturday, Jan. 14, at Oakstop, 1721 Broadway in downtown Oakland. The director, Amadeuz Christ (Δ+), an Oakland native now living in Atlanta, will be present, with Sabir Bey of the Sabir Bey Show, to discuss the content of the film. The post-film screening dialogue will be facilitated by Rahme’el Bey.

Wanda’s Picks for January 2017

January 2, 2017

2017 marks the centennial of the nation’s bloodiest race riot in the 20th century in East St. Louis, Illinois. Migrant Black people were hired to work as miners to replace striking white workers at the Aluminum Ore Co. The white workers stormed City Hall demanding redress from the mayor. Shortly thereafter, news of an attempted robbery of a white man by an armed Black man set off the reign of terror in downtown East St. Louis in which unarmed Black men, women and children were pulled from trollies and street cars and beaten and shot down in the street.

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Loving farewell to James Curtis Ratcliff

January 1, 2017

James Curtis Ratcliff was born on April 29, 1934, in East Liberty in “Deep East” Texas, a community of farmers and ranchers founded over 200 years ago by ancestors of the Ratcliffs and several other families, who still live there. For more than 50 years, he was a driver for Sunset Scavenger and then went to work for his brother, Dr. Willie Ratcliff, who had a contract with Alyeska Pipeline Co. James made his transition on Nov. 30, 2016, after a long illness. He will be greatly missed but never forgotten.

FREEDOM

December 31, 2016

I’m not shuckin’ and jivin’ for you! — I’m not gonna be yo’ house nigger! — NO. — I will look you in your eye … — then drink from that water fountain you’re standing by. — YES! I will. — I’m the modern day Nat Turner, Marcus Garvey, Harriet Tubman, Ida B. Wells, Pauli Murray, Lumumba, El Hajj Malik El Shabazz – that’s Malcolm if you ain’t in the know. I’m Elaine Brown, Bobby Seale, Ericka Huggins, Serena and Venus Williams – with the backhand!

Introducing Uncle Du, SF Bay View’s new comic strip!

December 25, 2016

My name is Emmanuel “Mandu-Ra” Johnson. I’m the inspiration behind the “Uncle Du” comic strip. My homie, Ruben Beltran, the artist behind the “Uncle Du” comic strips, told me how he received a letter from you guys – Bay View – and y’all agreed to put “Uncle Du” in your paper. I think that’s wonderful! When he told me he wrote y’all to see if y’all would publish the strip, I knew y’all would do it, because “Uncle Du” is all the news in Bay View rolled up in one. Everything “Uncle Du” stands for is what Bay View stands for, so it’s a perfect match.

Sista’s Place: How KHSU’s radio station helped bridge the gap between Arcata and Pelican Bay

December 17, 2016

Sharon Fennell, also well known by her disc jockey name Sista Soul, has been a Humboldt resident for over 30 years. Fennell, through her volunteer work at KHSU, has grown to become an advocate for prisoners and shown faithfulness in bringing awareness to the conditions and contradictions of America’s penal system. After 36 years, Fenell – or Sista as she is called by friends and close acquaintances – has decided to move on. She has one more radio show this Sunday, Dec. 18.

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