64.4 F
San Francisco
Sunday, August 25, 2019
Tags Civil Rights Act of 1964

Tag: Civil Rights Act of 1964

Blacks awarded only 1 percent of Caltrans contracts

At our council retreat in San Diego Jan. 18, during the presentation on how to correct the low 1 percent participation of African Americans in Caltrans contracting in the midst of a 17.9 percent DBE accomplishment, a council member made a comment that has made me feel compelled to clarify why this council is in existence. I know that most of us, particularly newer council members, may believe that we are here because we are qualified contractors, but in this country, with its inherent institutional discrimination where qualifications of certain ethnic groups don’t matter, we are here to pursue equality and equal opportunity, known as civil rights, for all classified minorities and women.

Incarceration, justice and the planet

Prisons inspire little in terms of natural wonder. But prisoners, one could assume, must have little concern for the flowers or for otherwise pressing environmental issues. With all the social quandaries present in their lives – walls of solitude, the loss of basic human rights – pollution, climate change and healthy ecosystems must seem so distantly important: an issue for the free. In actuality, prisoners are on the frontlines of the environmental movement.

AIDS group’s Castro billboards with Dr. King’s image have whites-only feel

Report after report reminds and warns the Black community that AIDS is not yet under control for the Black population. However, when I saw several new 6-foot-by-4-foot billboard ads in the Castro district of San Francisco this past week with the image of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. under the heading, “AIDS is a civil rights issue,” I first thought, “Well, that’s a stretch.”

‘Selma’ shockingly and sadly relevant

"Selma" gives a window into the turbulent three-month voting rights campaign, a series of pivotal protest marches in 1965 that culminated with President Johnson signing the Voting Rights Act of 1965. The movie offers a lens into King and imperiled activists’ attempts to travel a 54-mile highway from Selma to the Alabama state capital, Montgomery, in the face of blatant racism, brutality and de facto segregation.

Wanda’s Picks for September 2013

On the 20th anniversary of the demise of my father, Fred Ali Batin Sr., the 18th anniversary of the Maafa Commemoration San Francisco Bay Area – the Ritual Sunday is Oct. 13, 2013; see http://maafasfbayarea.com/ – and approximately the 60th day of the hunger strike to end the inhuman conditions in California’s Security Housing Units or SHUs, I just want to pause and reflect.

Scottsboro Boys pardoned: What other infamous civil rights cases are in...

The Scottsboro Boys have been vindicated, but there are many more waiting in the wings – waiting for justice. It is often said that justice delayed is justice denied. Many years have passed in so many unresolved civil rights crimes and injustices. And if no one is prepared to step up and pursue these cases, we must wonder if justice will ever come.

Political prisoners, mass incarceration and what’s possible for social movements

Since America’s MASS INCARCERATION is driven by unjust racial/class policies, then the real solution to MASS INCARCERATION is MASS “DECARCERATION.” In other words, drastic cuts to ALL prisoner’s TIME, since TIME is the currency, the legal tender, the great equalizer and righter of wrongs in prison.

Black pilots sue United Airlines for race discrimination

“From the Tuskegee Airmen who shed blood to defend a segregated nation in World War II to Capt. Marlon Green’s (Continental Airlines) Supreme Court decision (March 28, 1963), to Capt. Jim Edwards (United Airlines, 1967), determined individuals broke the color barrier in the commercial airline industry,” said Capt. Terry Haynie.

Bilingual education as it relates to African-Americans: the Ebonics debate

African Americans continue to be held at a disadvantage when it comes to learning English, partially due to their natural disposition to Ebonics and partially due to the discrimination and the indifference of America’s public school system. The Civil Rights Act of 1964 barred discrimination; however, Blacks have been yet to benefit from Title IV, which prevents discrimination by government agencies that receive federal funds.

We CAN put Blacks back to work

Unemployment in the African-American community is double and in some places triple the national average. You know it doesn’t have to be that way.

New NYPD data shows record number of stop-and-frisks in 12-month period

New data from the New York City Police Department shows the final total of stop-and-frisks for 2008 to be a record 531,159. Over 80 percent of them were of Black and Latino New Yorkers.

Newly released NYPD data shows shocking disparity in stop-and-frisks

From 2005 to 2008, approximately 80 percent of NYPD's total stops made were of Blacks and Latinos, who are more likely to have physical force used against them than Whites.

Latest News

Venezuela: An axis of hope, dignity and defiance stands up to...

We, the peoples of the Global South have the natural resources and power to humble the Empire. It is a well substantiated fact that if Europe and the US were denied access to our resources for two weeks, their economies would grind to a halt.

Rwanda’s Victoire Ingabire: I will not live in fear of prison...

I want the government to show us who killed all these members of the opposition in Rwanda and what happened to those who have disappeared.

Independent review of Public Defender Jeff Adachi’s autopsy shows death was...

“(N)othing in Jeff’s autopsy revealed any indication of chronic drug use or overdose. (The reports) provide peace of mind that we did know Jeff better than the circumstances of his death have suggested.” – Robert Chan, Adachi family attorney