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Friday, July 19, 2019
Tags Kenneth G. Keel

Tag: Kenneth G. Keel

Prop 36: Post Release Community Supervision?

In short, Post Release Community Supervision (PRCS) is county probation. Ironically, after nearly 16 years of being “incapacitated,” PRCS has turned out to be an unforeseeable blessing for this author! While utilizing the services and benefits available under PRCS (AB 109), my transition back into society has been virtually seamless.

Prop 36: Justice denied, now what?

While addressing the news about California’s voters overwhelmingly supporting the Three Strikes Reform Act, Prop 36, one district attorney stated that there are about 250 people from Kern County who are eligible for resentencing under Prop 36. And it is her job to make sure that none of them are released. That sentiment is shared by other district attorneys and judges throughout the state.

Three Strikes: Today’s civil rights challenge

Three Strikes has disproportionately targeted the poor and people of color. More than 70 percent of the Three Strikes prisoners serving life sentences are either African American or Latino; making Three Strikes one of the leading civil rights issues of today. We need your help. On Nov. 6, California residents will have another opportunity to amend Three Strikes. Vote Yes on Prop. 36.

Legendary prisoner ‘Mousy Brown’ perishes

On March 24, 2012, Leonard “Mousy Brown” Fulgham passed away while in the custody and care of the California Department of Corrections. His obituary read: “Mousy’s formative years occurred during the period known as the Black Power Struggle and the Civil Rights Movement ... This man’s presence will forever be felt, missed and recognized by the masses!”

A legendary Three Strikes prisoner dies

The people of the state of California, by and through their draconian Three Strikes and You’re Out law, have achieved another very shameful in-custody death. On April 19, at approximately 1:20 p.m., Jeremiah Sheppard tragically died on a dirt exercise track at the Folsom State Prison.

Prisoners win landmark case against the CDCr

After three years of appeals and litigation, I’m pleased to announce that, beginning Jan. 1, 2011, the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCr) will no longer be allowed to furnish prisoners food containing poisonous trans fats.

California prisons ignore anti-trans fat law

Toxins that were declared by the California Legislature to “have a detrimental impact on a person’s health” and cannot be used in school food service or food facility businesses are contained in food consumed by inmates in California prisons. The bodies of many – if not most – so-called strikers, lifers and other long-term prisoners are too toxic to pass an artery inspection.

Support Three Strikes reform

Sadly, March 7, 2009, marked the 15th anniversary for California's draconian Three Strikes and You're Out law. Fifteen years is one and a half decades, 180 months or 5,475 days. No matter how you calculate it, 15 years is too long for non-violent humans to be "incapacitated" for petty, non-serious and victimless crimes.

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Blow the whistle! How the wheels fell off the Warriors’ dynasty

Oakland is going to miss those million fan parties and victory parades when you crowned the whole town with championship trophies and jubilation! But hey, you gave us a great run while it lasted!

Reparations now! Pass HR 40!

Broaden this opening to envision the reparations we need to fully repair and heal African nations and people and increase the participation of our people in making our desperately needed reparations a reality – now!

Spotlight: Kevin Cooper’s case exemplifies decades of systemic failures

Not everyone caught in the criminal legal system prompts backsliding on reform, and not everyone is hit with high-profile murder charges. Not everyone is framed. And very few have Kim Kardashian fighting for them.

Heat-related conditions at the Allred Unit are cruel, unusual and a...

“Heat illness is a very serious matter in Texas prisons. I am a living witness to these conditions and many other unjust and cruel things that occur daily in Texas state prisons.”

It’s not ‘try to get justice’ no more; we WILL get...

When my feet first touched down in the streets of Ferguson, I felt connected suddenly, because I felt the pain of the people out there. I felt what was going on with them, and I did not want to leave.