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Sunday, May 16, 2021
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Tag: Africa

Lynn Nottage’s ‘Ruined,’ directed by Liesl Tommy, at Berkeley Rep through...

It is not often one sees a play written and directed by Black women, the director, Liesl Tommy, from Cape Town, South Africa. Only a fine writer like Lynn Nottage could take such tragedy and make us smile and laugh between the tears.

Libya, getting it right: a revolutionary pan-African perspective

There is no possibility of understanding what is happening in Libya within a Eurocentric framework. Libya’s system and the battle now taking place on its soil stands completely outside of the Western imagination. The battle that is being waged in Libya is fundamentally a battle between pan-African forces on the one hand, who are dedicated to the realization of Qaddafi’s vision of a united Africa, and Libyan Arab forces who look toward Europe and the Arab world for Libya’s future.

Wanda’s picks for March 2011

Women’s History Month and the 100th Anniversary of International Women’s Day March 8, 2011 – what a great month to toast the New Year. The name itself is an action, a call to action: MARCH – Move!

KPFA Weekend News on Uganda, Rwanda and Uganda’s Feb. 18 election

One of Uganda’s three leading opposition presidential candidates and others predict that Uganda could become the next Egypt or Tunisia after Friday’s presidential and parliamentary elections, which few expect to be free or fair.

Lucy Parsons: ‘Shoot them or stab them’

Lucy Parsons is the Haymarket Square widow who internationalized the struggle for the eight-hour day and whose work led to the May Day rallies held around the world, except in the U.S., to celebrate International Workers Day.

Notes from Tripoli, Libya, Africa

My comrades, Hajj Malcolm Shabazz and Ra'Shida, and I (Minister of Information JR) were invited by international peace activist Cynthia McKinney to participate in the historic Conference of African Migrants in Europe held from Jan. 15-17 in Tripoli, Libya. Malcolm spoke at a televised event and got a standing ovation.

50 years after Lumumba: The burden of history

It wasn’t just Patrice Lumumba his assassins wanted to kill, it was the genuine self-determination, dreams and aspirations of African people, writes Horace Campbell, reflecting on the murder of the first prime minister of the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) on Jan. 17, 1961. Two poems by Lumumba follow the story.

Pentagon burns bio-fuels to secure fossil fuels; more of both come...

Opponents of biofuels planting projects, in Africa and other parts of the global South, argue that cropland should be used to grow food to feed people, not to grow more combustible fuel, especially not fuel for the U.S. military.

Radioactive spill in Arlit, Niger, home to ‘significant quantities of uranium...

Arlit, Niger, in the Sahara Desert surfaced in international news in January 2003, when George W. Bush, in his State of the Union address, said what came to be known as “the 16 words” that became a central pretext for the Iraq War: “The British government has learned that Saddam Hussein recently sought significant quantities of uranium from Africa.”

Broadway San Jose’s ‘The Color Purple’ through Nov. 28

It’s been 25 years since the film version of Alice Walker’s “The Color Purple” opened to much controversy. Despite the controversy, the story is one that is still read, watched and celebrated in many forms. The San Jose production of the musical is fantastic! This is the final weekend.

Ted Pontiflet says farewell to Oakland

Ted Pontiflet is an Oakland icon. He is East Coast swing meets West Coast bop. Classy. The man is too smooth to be close to 80. Ted is around until Dec. 1 and then away he goes.

Disaster capitalism – in Haiti, Congo, Pakistan and New Orleans

A series of disasters has displaced and killed millions of people. Distinguished panelists who are not afraid to voice radical viewpoints give us an update on the current situation in Haiti, the DR Congo, Pakistan and New Orleans. Two of these advocates, Ezili Danto of Haiti and Kambale Musavuli of the Congo, are well known to Bay View readers. Ezili (longtime readers will remember her as Marguerite Laurent) emphasizes the economic disparity in Haiti: Half of 1 percent of Haitians own 98 percent of the wealth.

From New York’s Basquiat to Oakland’s Eesuu: an interview with visual...

Eesuu is one of my favorite male visual artists in the Bay, and in my opinion he is one of the dopest in the country right next to Malik Seneferu and Jocelyn Goode. I have been a fan of his art for years. I love the themes that he creates from, as well as the vibrant colors that he uses in some of his pieces.

Kagame regime demands Professor Peter Erlinder return to Kigali to stand...

Rwandan President Kagame denied the accusations in the new U.N. report, most of all the accusations of genocide, and then responded by arresting Victoire Ingabire Umuhoza, the second of three opposition presidential candidates to be jailed since attempting to contest this year’s presidential election against Kagame.

Pam Africa: 100% death penalty abolition must include Mumia

Minister of Information JR speaks with Pam Africa about a secret memo signed by the U.S. members of the Steering Committee of the World Coalition Against the Death Penalty that can be summed up as "throwing Mumia under the bus."