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2011 January

Monthly Archives: January 2011

Survival Radio

We don’t need to be “given” a voice. We have a voice. What we don’t have is our own radio transmitters, television and radio broadcasts, and TV stations. PNN is the voices of people who are never heard.

Kagame court again denies bail to Victoire Ingabire

On Jan. 20, Rwanda’s High Court once again rejected the bail appeal of Victoire Ingabire Umuhoza, chair of Rwanda’s FDU-Inkingi coalition of opposition parties.

Wealthy Menlo Hotel owner charged with arson scam is back in court

The wealthy Tiburon owner of Oakland’s low-income residential Menlo Hotel has been arrested and is facing 10 years in prison on suspicion of hiring someone to burn down the hotel, according to officials with the federal Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives.

Revolution has come!

Hallelujah! Revolution has come! The political miracle spreads as the power of the people manifests all over North Africa, particularly Tunisia and Egypt. This could very possibly be the beginning of a global revolution that would free the people of the world from the tyranny of the 1 percent who own 80 percent of the world’s resources – and initiate real democratic self-determination. As Frederick Douglass noted: “Power concedes nothing without a demand.” We must collectively and globally demand our human rights, human equality. All power to the people! People of the world, unite! - Kiilu Nyasha

Victory for Kalahari Bushmen: Court grants right to water

In a momentous decision Jan. 27, Botswana’s Court of Appeal quashed a ruling that denied the Kalahari Bushmen access to water on their ancestral lands.

Why did SFPD shoot Randal Dunklin in his wheelchair?

As the police continue to shoot unarmed and mentally disabled people, including a man in a wheelchair, the community is speaking out against these incidents of excessive force. On Martin Luther King Day, Monday, Jan. 17, about 150 San Franciscans and Bay Area activists expressed their outrage with a march and rally in San Francisco.

Museveni regime denies Kato’s murder was homophobic

How can Ugandan Deputy Police Spokesperson Vincent Sekate, before doing an investigation, be so sure that David Kato’s murder had nothing to do with his being openly gay or with his work as advocacy officer for Sexual Minorities Uganda? And why does the U.S. keep throwing money and weaponry behind the regime that Sekate speaks for?

AeroSoul 2: Urban Hieroglyphics

In honor of African History Month, the Bay Area Aerosol Heritage Society is proud to present AeroSoul 2011, which will kick off on Feb. 4 at the Joyce Gordon Gallery in Downtown Oakland and be followed by a month-long series of events showcasing some of the most cutting-edge, dynamic Black urban calligraphers in the world. Refa 1 is the event curator.

50 years after Lumumba: The burden of history

It wasn’t just Patrice Lumumba his assassins wanted to kill, it was the genuine self-determination, dreams and aspirations of African people, writes Horace Campbell, reflecting on the murder of the first prime minister of the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) on Jan. 17, 1961. Two poems by Lumumba follow the story.

Subpoenas: Support resisters to FBI raids and grand juries

Across the country organizations and individuals are standing together to protest the United States government’s attempt to silence and criminalize anti-war and international solidarity activists in solidarity with them. Legendary lawyer Lynne Stewart, who is already in prison, and an activist who has been subpoenaed by the grand jury tell why they resist.

State of the Union Address must include substantive jobs plan

On Jan. 11, 1944, in the midst of World War II and on the heels of the worst economic disaster in the history of the country, President Franklin D. Roosevelt proposed a new “Economic Bill of Rights.” Today, 67 years later, we must push for a similar set of rights

U.S. backed the invasion of Eastern Congo on Obama’s inauguration day

Instead of the racist story about Hutus killing Tusis with machetes in 100 days of genocide, the truth is that the U.S., British and Israeli military and their Ugandan and Rwandan proxy forces are responsible for genocide against both Tutsis and Hutus in Rwanda, Congo and Burundi.

WikiLeaks points to U.S. meddling in Haiti

Confidential U.S. diplomatic cables from 2005 and 2006 released this week by WikiLeaks reveal Washington’s well-known obsession to keep exiled former President Jean-Bertrand Aristide out of Haiti and Haitian affairs. “All efforts must be made to keep Aristide from returning to Haiti or influencing the political process,” the U.S. embassy told Brazil, which heads the U.N. occupation of Haiti. Did those efforts include covering up the assassination of the Brazilian general in charge who had no taste for slaughtering Haitians who simply want their president back?

An urgent call: Return former President Jean-Bertrand Aristide to Haiti

Haiti Action Committee is honored to post this full-page ad that appeared Sunday, Jan. 23, 2011, in the Miami Herald, echoing the call of Haiti’s democratic movement for the return of President Aristide.

Bay Area Black Builders call on Black churches to build Black

On Saturday, Jan. 30, at 10 a.m., the Bay Area Black Builders plan to picket the Lord’s house. Beth Eden Church, a great church in the Black community, indicates that it has contracted with a White contractor apparently chosen by the lender, to build an addition.

Power to the people: A welcome prison victory in Ohio

Although on a very small scale (which by no means diminishes the deed), we, the people, have wrought a revolution – “a sudden and momentous change in a situation” – and accomplished in 12 days what the powers that be have repeatedly told us would never happen.

‘Haiti, Harvest of Hope’: The making of a movement for democracy

“Haiti: Harvest of Hope” is an exceptional must-watch film which documents the brutal regimes of Francois and Jean Claude Duvalier, Papa Doc and Baby Doc, and the rise of Jean Bertrand Aristide's Lavalas movement and the coming of democracy to Haiti.

Aristide should be allowed to return to Haiti

Haiti’s infamous dictator “Baby Doc” Duvalier returned to his country this week, while the country’s first elected president, Jean-Bertrand Aristide, is kept out. These two facts really say everything about Washington’s policy toward Haiti and our government’s respect for democracy.

Georgia prisoners staged a STRIKE, not a riot or a protest

The prison strike has ended in seven Georgia prisons, but organizing is ongoing. The political consequences of their actions could shift politics in Georgia and far beyond the state; thus the strike deserves solidarity from every corner.

Congresswoman Waters opposes plot to control Haiti

The plot to control Haiti has gone from the absurd to the ridiculous. The return of Jean Claude "Baby Doc" Duvalier raises serious questions about who in Haiti facilitated his return and what his supporters expect to gain by bringing him back.